Aug 15 , 2013

President Barack Obama said it best in a recent interview on NPR. “As humans, we can identify galaxies light years away. We can study particles smaller than an atom, but we still haven't unlocked the mystery of the three pounds of matter that sits between our ears.”

David Eagleman and Rice President David Leebron David Eagleman and Rice President David Leebron as seen on campus this summer.

It’s a great point. So in September, we’re gathering eight of some of the brightest minds in neuroscience to explain – or perhaps help us question – what we know and understand of our brains. One of our instructors, David Eagleman, Ph.D., author and neuroscientist in the departments of neuroscience and psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine, recently answered a question in The New Yorker about that sneaking suspicion that time is flying by faster and faster as we get older. (Is it really almost September?) “Probably the best idea to stop that from happening is to make sure that we are always doing novel things, always feeding our brains new memories. Try driving a different route home from work each day. Or wearing your watch on your other hand or brushing your teeth with your other hand. Or going on an unusual, adventuresome vacation.”

As a general rule, I think it's wise to trust advice from renowned neuroscientists like Dr. Eagleman, so why not take this opportunity to “feed your brain” a new experience? Learn with us in “The Newest in Neuroscience: How the Brain Affects Every Aspect of our World,” beginning September 19.

“There are an infinite number of boring things to do in science, but we live these short life spans, Dr. Eagleman has said. “Why not do the thing that’s the coolest thing in the world to do?”

Kim Espinosa

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Kim Espinosa, Marketing Specialist

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